How to give your child cold and flu medicine.

4.2
How to give your child cold and flu medicine.
5 Min Read

Giving your child cold or flu medicine may seem like the best option if your toddler is suffering from it, but that's not always the case.

It is difficult for parents to see their children injured. Fall and winter are the best times to get a virus, while the flu and common cold are two of the most common times. It is estimated that most children get six to eight colds a year, and 1 to 20 to 30 percent of children develop the disease each year.

It's not always easy to tell a cold from a runny nose, which makes it more difficult if you need medication. Giving your child cold or flu medicine may seem like the best option if your toddler is suffering from it, but that's not always the case. Here, with expert help, you'll find everything you need to know about giving your child cold and flu medicine.

Cold and flu symptoms in children.

Colds and flu are very similar, so it's helpful to be able to differentiate between the two. Here's how to find out what it is.

Symptoms of a cold.

Although every child is different, there are some general rules for cold symptoms. Symptoms gradually improve over 10-14 days, but the persistent cough may persist for 3 days or 4 weeks.

Common cold symptoms in children.

  • Cough
  • Runny nose
  • Low-grade fever
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Nasal congestion
  • Fatigue

Cold symptoms are similar in older children but include a sore throat, headache, muscle aches, a mild cough, watery eyes, sneezing, and a runny nose that is usually thick and yellow or green.

Flu symptoms.

In terms of disease, the three main types of influenza are A, B, and C, with types A and B, usually infecting poppies in the winter. Complications of types A and B can lead to hospitalization, so the flu vaccine is very important. Influenza C is a less serious illness that may cause few or no respiratory symptoms.

Common flu symptoms in children.

  • High fever (103°F (39.4°C) to 105°F (40.5°C))
  • Sore throat and cough
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Headache, muscle, or body aches
  • Vomiting and/or diarrhea

Flu symptoms in children are similar to the common cold, but one of the biggest differences is the fever. A cold can cause a mild fever, but the flu can cause a very high temperature, ranging from 103°F (39.4°C) to 105°F (40.5°C). In other words, just like the common cold, not everyone who has the flu has a fever. In addition to a high fever, the most common flu symptoms in children are sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle and body aches, headache, muscle and body aches, fatigue, cough, vomiting, and diarrhea.

According to the CDC, more than six months out of each year, you should get an annual flu shot. Vaccination is especially important for people who are at high risk of complications from the flu, such as:

  • Pregnant
  • Old people
  • Children

For the first flu shot, children ages 6 months to 8 years may need two doses at least four weeks apart. They can then get an annual dose of the flu vaccine.
Book an appointment with pediatric care if your child has a severe flu.