Which Granite Colors Are The Least Expensive? title here...

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Which Granite Colors Are The Least Expensive? title here...

Have you ever secretly admired the granite counters of a friend’s house and wondered about the cost of the investment? You might think that granite is expensive, but that is not always true. In fact, while natural stone countertops are definitely one of the more pricier materials to use in the house, that doesn’t mean that you can’t get what you want. If you want granite but don’t want to empty out the savings fund doing so, it’s time to learn how to shop smarter.

As you may know, granite comes in three different grades. Color, origin and other factors determine the cost of granite, as well as the grade. Since color changes with rarity, knowing which colors of granite are the least expensive can help you get the best deal on your new counters.

Here is everything you need to know about finding the least expensive granite color without sacrificing quality.

What Is Considered A Premium Color?

The standard rule is this: Granite with plain colors and typical patterns are going to be readily available and, therefore, cheaper than those that are considered a rarity. Classic patterns are seen in low- and mid-grade granite includes solid, marbled, and speckled. China, Brazil, and India produce the most low- to mid-grade granite for sale, and some are prefabricated.

Depending on the minerals existing where the granite formed, you can find more “premium” colors and exotic patterns. High-end varieties include:

  • Typhoon Bordeaux – Brazil
  • Santa Cecilia – Brazil
  • Blue Louise (Van Gogh) – Brazil; this is the most expensive granite in the world
  • Del Mare – Brazil
  • Solarius – Brazil
  • African Ivory – Namibia
  • Azul Platino – Spain

If you are looking for a more unique stone (while saving yourself the cost of premium colors), it is best to visit a fabricator over a home improvement store. Fabricators are going to have way more options and can also give you advice about which type of granite to choose.

How Granite Prices Are Determined

Despite having different grades, every granite shop is going to have their own unique system for pricing. Therefore, you need to consider the availability of granite in your area as well as the various colors and grading levels.

Grading is based on color, hard and soft minerals, place of origin, and other factors, such as imperfections in the stone. Ultimately, the more exotic the granite, the more expensive it will be.

What Are The Least Expensive Colors of Granite?

Are some colors cheaper than others? Yes. Let’s have a look at the cheaper colors of granite to find out why they cost less than other premium examples.

Uba Tuba/Green Labrador

You might be surprised to see that a greenish looking granite would be one of the cheapest around. Uba Tuba is from Brazil, and there are vast quantities of it. It is a great option for kitchens that are painted lighter colors since it usually is a rich green mixed with golds, silver, and tan. It is a low-grade granite.

White Kashmir

With varying shades of cream, eggshell, and pure white, this type of granite looks clean but elegant and can brighten up the space. It is brought in from India and is considered a mid-grade stone. Sometimes, you can even find White Kashmir counters with speckles of red, green, and silver.

Venetian Gold

Though Venetian Gold is considered mid-grade, it looks like a million dollars. The honey-colored base stone is blended with streaks or dappling of black, red, and amber. The best part is that, if you don’t know what color to get, Venetian Gold goes well in any setting.

Silver Or Black Pearl

Black granite can look plain—but not the pearl blends. If you wanted a subdued countertop to complement darker woods or colors, then silver or black pearl is ideal. Most of this granite is brought in from Norway, but some veins have been found in India as well. It is a little more expensive than some others, since it is considered a mid-grade (level 2) granite, but it is still budget-friendly.

Tan Brown

Looking for a more earthy tone? Tan Brown granite from India adds a touch of sophistication with its mixture of grays, browns, and blacks. Some slabs will also have various patterns, such as streaking and mottling.

Other Tips For Finding Cheap Granite

Now, it is important to note that color does not affect the overall price of granite all that much, unless you are looking at the rarest samples around. There are other reasons one slab of granite may be more costly than another. Knowing the reasons behind the pricing of granite can help you determine which one is going to be the best investment for your home.

Quality. Even if a piece of granite is a rare color, it has to be decent quality too. When granite has a high percentage of softer minerals, it will be cheaper than those with more resilient properties. Pattern and imperfections also decreases the cost.

Size. How much granite do you need? Can you reduce the cost by making one portion of your counter space granite then use a different material for the rest?

Color. Less common colors will cost more; some cost a lot because they are harder to work with, such as red and brown. Beige, green, and white colors are the most common.

Edging and Design Complexity. Do you want a special design? What about unique edging? These custom features will make the granite cost more.

Polish. If you want a high-quality finish or polish on the granite to really make it shine, you will end up paying more.

Thickness. Sometimes, you can reduce the cost of granite by ordering a thinner piece. While this does have some drawbacks, such as less durability and more chances of cracking, it can be a good way to reduce the overall cost. Most fabricators will suggest adding a plywood backing to prevent damage.

Takeaway

There you have it: the least expensive colors of granite as well as tips to spend less. Hopefully, you can find a color and style that will match your kitchen or bathroom and make it look beautiful. Either way, you will be making a wise investment, as well as upgrading the overall look of your home.