The Algerian Wine Industry & Conquistador’s Impact on Wine in South America

4.9
The Algerian Wine Industry & Conquistador’s Impact on Wine in South America
3 Min Read

The Algerian Wine Industry & Conquistador’s Impact on Wine in South America

The Algerian wine industry emerged seemingly out of nowhere in the nineteenth century. The history of the European colonization of Africa is also closely linked to the history of the Algerian wine industry.

The 1930s: Algerian Wine

By the 1930s, Algeria was creating 6-7% of all glasses of wine internationally. But its role in the worldwide glass of wine profession was much more significant than this figure recommends. Algeria's populace is mostly Muslim; therefore, most of their white wine was exported. Therefore, in the years prior to the First World War, Algeria made up 40% of wine exports internationally.

The wine in algerian history is complex and deeply intertwined with politics, mainly colonization and then the independence of Algeria. In the 1930s, Algeria had grown into the world’s largest exporter of wine. However, when the French ceded control in 1962, things soon turned south for Algeria’s wine industry.

The Conquistador’s Impact on Wine in South America

Let’svarietals talk about the Conquistador Wine History

In 1554, Spanish vanquishers as well as promoters delivered European Viti's vinifera vines to Chile. According to mythology, the conquistador Francisco de Aguirre planted the very first vines.

The creeping plants were probably sourced from widely known Spanish vineyards. The "typical black grape," as it was known, was given to Mexico by Hernán Cortés in 1520, as well as the plants probably originated from existing Spanish wineries in Peru.

This grape variety would ultimately progress to become a variety called País, one of the most extensively planted grape varietals in Chile until the 21st century. Jesuit priests planted these very early vineyards and made use of the white wine to celebrate the Eucharist.

By the late 16th century, files from this period describe plenty of plantings of "the typical black grape", Muscatel, Torontel, Albilho, and Mollar.

For more information regarding the Conquistadors and wine visit here: https://thisdayinwinehistory.com/the-conquistadors-impact-on-wine-in-south-america/