A N.Y. Times Take on What Canadians Told The Paper About Their Thanksgiving

4.5
159
A N.Y. Times Take on What Canadians Told The Paper About Their Thanksgiving
Published in JOURNEYS INTO... | about 4 years ago

A Journey into Canada

Thanksgiving in Day in Canada has long been a curious interest to me.

First, it is observed during the harvest time. Second, to me (an American) it appeared classically Canadian - understated in a positive way, and lacking the commercialized hype that accompanies its U.S. counterpart.

As Canadians prepare to gather this year's harvest bounty to prepare a Thanksgiving meal next week, the New York Times in a Food Section piece headlined "For Canadians, Thanksgiving Is a ‘Quieter’ Affair in October" has tried to raised the consciousness of Americans about Thanksgiving north of the border.

In offering a contrast of the two Thanksgiving Day, it interestingly made reference to " the vast Thanksgiving-industrial complex", that "keeps a conspiracy of silence about the existence of a parallel harvest dinner outside the United States. Taste of Home, the American food magazine with the largest circulation, says it has never run any articles about the Canadian holiday..."

Asked to distinguish Canadian Thanksgiving to the U.S. version one Canadian living in New York, opined, "“It gets to a conversation of what exactly is Canadian food”.

The article has its share of generalizations that only reinforce caricatures of what Canada is about (See the print headlines: "Who Knew ? Canada Has Thanksgiving Too"; "Trying to explain their version of the holiday can be a thankless task for Canadians living in America") their Thanksgiving and what it means to be Canadian, but the fact that the subject has received any print at all should be considered an improvement.

At the least, it should provoke some thought and perhaps a discussion on both sides of the border on what we do and why - lest we run the risk of forgetting that the point is of being thankful, no matter whether it occurs in October or November - in Canada or the U.S..